International Summer School Language and Space

Kloster Kappel, 4–9 September 2016

 



About the Summer School

Communication is inherently linked to physical and social space both in the sense of language areas (dialects and language contact situations) and in the sense of everyday interactions (interaction spaces). By choosing a particular language or regional variety, we identify with and/or distinguish ourselves from others. Modeling these choices is far from being a straight-forward process, and the nature of spatial limits to dialects and languages or the mapping of linguistic data to the actual landscape are still not sufficiently understood. In addition, defining interactional spaces poses a challenge to linguistic research at the micro-level of face-to-face communication, with its complex interplay involving perceptions, movements, and actions.

Seven leading experts in the area of language and space will present and discuss their recent research findings in these fields. Students will also have a chance to present their own research projects if they wish.

Teachers

  • Naomi Baron, American University, Washington, DC
    When space is virtual: Redefining reading and memory
  • Ellen Brandner, University of Konstanz
    Varying areal patterns of syntactic variation
  • Curdin Derungs and Robert Weibel, University of Zurich
    Spatial analysis and visualization of linguistic data
  • Andreas H. Jucker, University of Zurich
    Interactional architecture, space and virtual worlds
  • Crispin Thurlow, University of Berne
    "Non-Places" and "Empty Spaces": The Social Semiotics of Elite Mobility
  • Daniel Schreier, University of Zurich
    The spatial diffusion of English and the emergence of indigenized varieties

Schedule

The Summer School will start in the late afternoon on Sunday, September 4, 2016. There will be three two-hour sessions each day on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday. On Wednesday there will be two sessions and an excursion in the afternoon. On Friday, September 9, 2016, the Summer School will end with a last session and a closing event. Monday and Tuesday evenings will be reserved for (optional) presentations of work in progress by participants (Format: Pecha Kucha).

Location

Kloster Kappel
The Summer School will be held at Kloster Kappel in central Switzerland. “Located in the countryside, surrounded by forest, meadows and fruit trees, with a spectacular view over the Alps, between Lake Zurich and Lake Zug, the Kloster Kappel is an ideal place for hiking, cycling, a conference or private event.” (http://www.klosterkappel.ch/en)

Travel information

Kloster Kappel can be reached by train in less than an hour from the airport in Zurich. At the airport take the train to Zurich, where you have to change to a train to Baar, then by post van (Bus N° 280 - Hausen am Albis ) in 10 minutes to Kappel am Albis (5 km). The bus stop “Kappel am Albis” is in front of Kloster Kappel (about a 2 minute walk).

The easiest connections leave the airport 13 minutes after every hour, e.g. as follows (check http://www.sbb.ch for details and further connections):

14:13 Zurich airport (from track 3; train heading for Zürich, Bern, Geneve)
14:23 Zurich HB (=main station)
14:35 Zurich HB (from track 5; train heading for Luzern)
14:56 Baar
15:00 Baar (Bus 280 heading for Hausen am Albis, Post)
15:09 Kappel am Albis, Kloster

Registration

The course is restricted to 32 participants. Final deadline for applications: June 30, 2016.

Please, send CV, a letter of motivation and a brief abstract of your current research project (no more than 500 words each) in one pdf file.

Cost

  • Regular: 650 CHF (ca € 600; $ 650)
  • UZH students: 400 CHF
  • Discount: 400 CHF (available on application for participants from countries with currency problems)

Cost includes

  • Accommodation (double room)
  • 3 meals a day (starting with dinner on Sunday and ending with breakfast or optional lunch on Friday)
  • Tuition
  • Excursion

Contact

If you have any questions, please contact: Raffaela Zaugg,  summerschool@spur.uzh.ch

Supported by

URPP Language and Space, University of Zurich